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A couple days ago my wife spent about 50 minutes in bumper to bumper, stop and go, traffic waiting to pay the toll crossing from Michigan into Ontario. As she paid and was cleared to cross the bridge she noticed the transmission overheat warning light had come on and was yellow. She had to cross the bridge but then stopped and shut off the car for 15 minutes and the light went off and the temp back to normal. She drove for six more hours with no problem. The car has 7k miles on it and I'm assuming this is probably a normal thing for the DCT but it made me wonder just how normal it is or how often it happened to others with this transmission. Also a bit worried about how long it would have been before the light turned red. Thoughts?
 

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🌟2021 KIA Seltos SX Turbo
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The DCT has to be driven similar to a manual transmission in traffic. Driving it like a traditional automatic in bumper to bumper traffic is like riding the clutch in a manual. Take advantage of the ISG feature by not turning it off. I have yet to see my transmission overheat in heavy traffic, even in bumper to bumper uphill traffic.
 

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Apparently the problem is most noticed when leaving it in Drive and letting the engine keep you 'stopped' - example, going up a slight hill like at the bridge you mentioned, or 'creeping' along using the brake on and off. That is easy to demonstrate. You must fully put the brake pedal down - this disengages the clutch (or shift to neutral, but that is not necessary). This video explains the situation well for a dry dual clutch like we have....

Like someone said, it doesn't happen very often but from what I see, the 2023 Seltos is going back to a standard automatic transmission....which is what I would prefer also.
 

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2022 SX Turbo - Gravity Grey / Burgundy Interior
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Like someone said, it doesn't happen very often but from what I see, the 2023 Seltos is going back to a standard automatic transmission....which is what I would prefer also.
This is sad to hear, but not surprising overall. The DCT is a far more sport/driver oriented transmission than the Seltos target audience is used to (for the most part).
 

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I am so sorry to say that I have traded in my 2021 Seltos SX Turbo Starbright yellow with a black top. Insert crying emoji here. After waiting 5 months for the transmission repair and after 5 months of driving a 2022 Sportage (not sure what the acronym is) top of the line turbo; we opted to trade in the Seltos for the Sportage. I am truly heart broken! But I couldn't trust the Seltos any longer. Driving into a higher elevation of our state with no traffic issues; just driving fast and aggressive up the hills and having the transmission crap out from that...well no thanks. I have made the same drive many times in the year that I had the Seltos and have had no issues. But I really did not want to be stranded again. So, the Sportage is a very nice car and drives as nice as the Seltos; it's just not the right color LOL. I have a set of all weather mats, custom cut from Weathertech that I need to find a buyer (USA) for. Keeping the window shades (also from Weathertech) as they fit the Sportage reasonably well. Still enjoying reading the forum so for now am continuing with the subscription. Should've listened to others to wait till it has been in the US market for a couple years. I don't think the car was fully tested in the kind of dry heat here in Arizona. Such a shame. :( Hey Kia, if you need a tester in extreme dry heat, I'll do that for you!!
 

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Soooo...they took 5 months and never did repair/replace the transmission....? Geez.... Glad things worked out with the Sportage..... We leave tomorrow for a CO to WA state trip - these problems tend to stay in the back your mind, unfortuntaely...but it has done it before no problem....
 

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This is sad to hear, but not surprising overall. The DCT is a far more sport/driver oriented transmission than the Seltos target audience is used to (for the most part).
You're right. However, the TCU programming is VERY conservative on the Seltos. Slow and gentle shifts across the board. I mean, you can't even take advantage of brake boosting with the DCT, haha. It's pretty dumb. I don't understand why they bothered to put it in this car, because the way they programmed it doesn't take advantage of ANY of the inherent strengths of a DCT. Lol.

All the reviews of H/K's newer 8spd DCT, on the other hand, seem to show some really exciting performance. But still, I don't think the Seltos would really take advantage of any of it.
 

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2022 SX Turbo - Gravity Grey / Burgundy Interior
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You're right. However, the TCU programming is VERY conservative on the Seltos. Slow and gentle shifts across the board. I mean, you can't even take advantage of brake boosting with the DCT, haha. It's pretty dumb. I don't understand why they bothered to put it in this car, because the way they programmed it doesn't take advantage of ANY of the inherent strengths of a DCT. Lol.

All the reviews of H/K's newer 8spd DCT, on the other hand, seem to show some really exciting performance. But still, I don't think the Seltos would really take advantage of any of it.
Slap the shifter over into Sport mode, it’s not conservative…just need to drive it right…
 

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Slap the shifter over into Sport mode, it’s not conservative…just need to drive it right…

Oh I have. I guess it's all relative. Ever driven the ZF8 in the Giulia? Or an Audi RS3? Those transmissions blow the H/K 7spd DCT out of the water. Lightning quick shifts in manual mode. Way more performance oriented...and the ZF is a traditional torque converter auto.

Don't get me wrong, the cars that use the ZF8 and Audi's 7spd DCT are in a different league (and price point), but my only point is that's what I think of when I consider what a DCT excels at - and the H/K 7spd DCT is just plain lazy compared to that.
 

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2022 SX Turbo - Gravity Grey / Burgundy Interior
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Oh I have. I guess it's all relative. Ever driven the ZF8 in the Giulia? Or an Audi RS3? Those transmissions blow the H/K 7spd DCT out of the water. Lightning quick shifts in manual mode. Way more performance oriented...and the ZF is a traditional torque converter auto.

Don't get me wrong, the cars that use the ZF8 and Audi's 7spd DCT are in a different league (and price point), but my only point is that's what I think of when I consider what a DCT excels at - and the H/K 7spd DCT is just plain lazy compared to that.
Lol, it’s not a Golf R…programming or designing the transmission to behave as such in a Seltos would be pretty pointless. It’s plenty snappy for what the vehicle is intended.
 

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Lol, it’s not a Golf R…programming or designing the transmission to behave as such in a Seltos would be pretty pointless. It’s plenty snappy for what the vehicle is intended.

I mean.....that's exactly my point? Any type of DCT isn't needed for this car. A torque converted auto would be even better (yet still be "sporty") - I figure Kia only used the DCT due to packaging. They probably don't have a torque converted auto tranny that would fit or be modern enough to meet longevity or gas mileage targets.

Oh well. I'm beating a dead horse. Take care.
 

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2022 SX Turbo - Gravity Grey / Burgundy Interior
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I mean.....that's exactly my point? Any type of DCT isn't needed for this car. A torque converted auto would be even better (yet still be "sporty") - I figure Kia only used the DCT due to packaging. They probably don't have a torque converted auto tranny that would fit or be modern enough to meet longevity or gas mileage targets.

Oh well. I'm beating a dead horse. Take care.
Let's face it, they are more efficient and will get better fuel mileage than a traditional torque converter. I think that may be what the end goal was in trying to keep the 1.6 Turbo as fuel efficient as possible and still having a sportier feel.
I like the feel of it, but I've driven many different DSG transmissions and standards so I don't find it strange to drive. Most people run into issues when they have never driven one (or either) and are used to a traditional automatic. They (DSG's, DCT's) just don't do the same things the same way and if you try to make them, they really don't like it.
 

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2022 SX Turbo - Gravity Grey / Burgundy Interior
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I do have one thing to add regarding regular automatics. Having driven some truly terrible automatic transmissions over the years I can say that the Kia DCT is quite nice to drive and (when in sport mode) very reasonably responsive. Yeah it hiccups occasionally, but if you've ever driven the godawful ZF 9-speed transmission they put in the current Jeep Cherokee, you'd be heaping nothing but praise on the Kia solution...lol.
 

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Seltos GT-line, (=SX), 2020 model, Mars Orange, 1.6L turbo, AWD
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I mean.....that's exactly my point? Any type of DCT isn't needed for this car. A torque converted auto would be even better (yet still be "sporty") - I figure Kia only used the DCT due to packaging. They probably don't have a torque converted auto tranny that would fit or be modern enough to meet longevity or gas mileage targets.

Oh well. I'm beating a dead horse. Take care.
I'm in Oz, and my Seltos is the top 2020 model here with the 1.6 turbo and DCT. I grew up on manuals, but loved autos when they became more available. I drove a Celica GT4 4WD turbo (rally model) for 28 years, and loved it but my only regret was the manual change was not slick, but there was no auto option. But I have never loved an auto as much as I love the DCT in this GT-line Seltos. It is smooth, quick, (even in the Eco mode), and in the Normal and Sport modes absolutely amazing, and I'm hard to please. They are so good I seldom drag the shifter across to the 'manual' position, other than sometimes in steepish descents. I find it hard to relate to your comments, unless the US models get an inferior set-up..?
 

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2022 SX Turbo - Gravity Grey / Burgundy Interior
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I'm in Oz, and my Seltos is the top 2020 model here with the 1.6 turbo and DCT. I grew up on manuals, but loved autos when they became more available. I drove a Celica GT4 4WD turbo (rally model) for 28 years, and loved it but my only regret was the manual change was not slick, but there was no auto option. But I have never loved an auto as much as I love the DCT in this GT-line Seltos. It is smooth, quick, (even in the Eco mode), and in the Normal and Sport modes absolutely amazing, and I'm hard to please. They are so good I seldom drag the shifter across to the 'manual' position, other than sometimes in steepish descents. I find it hard to relate to your comments, unless the US models get an inferior set-up..?
As I said in your other post...couldn't agree more.
My experience here in Canada pretty much mirrors yours...(especially because, in a mirror...you are driving on the wrong side)
 

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Seltos GT-line, (=SX), 2020 model, Mars Orange, 1.6L turbo, AWD
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Actually, this issue of who is driving on the best side is an old chestnut, but an interesting one, all the same. From history, one can claim that keeping to - or driving - on the left of the road, eg, as in a right hand drive vehicle, is the originally normal way. However, because in France, Napoleon decided, in the interests of speed and time, his gun-towing rigs and other military traffic could drive past the peasants, who kept left, and charge up past them on the right. The aristocracy then decided that if that was good enough for the military, then it was good enough for their carriages, and so no real surprise that when powered vehicles came on the scene, they also drove on the right. The French being right up there in the development of the car, the rest, by sheer weight on numbers is history. The Brits, on the other hand kept travelling on the left, and so naturally most of their colonies do also.

What I find interesting however, is I have often heard drivers who are normally used to driving on the right, ie left hand drive, find it easier to drive on the left, in a RHD vehicle, than those of us when we have to drive on the right, in a LHD vehicle - suggesting that keeping left is actually more instinctive..? I reason this may come back to back in the 'olden days' when folk had swords or pistols, etc, it is more natural to use those in the right hand, so steered with the left hand, and kept to the left, so their weapon was between them, and anyone coming by..? That's my theory anyway, and I'm sticking to it. 😊 🙏
 

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2022 SX Turbo - Gravity Grey / Burgundy Interior
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Another interesting difference in our market, which I'm guessing you probably don't have, is factory remote start. Nothing particularly novel about a remote start, other than the way they implemented it (which I just discovered tonight). In every vehicle I have ever owned or driven with factory remote start, you have to push the start button once you get inside and before you can go anywhere. I tried mine for the first time tonight and I was wondering WTH was going on when I got back in the car...went to push the button (because the vehicle started dinging at me) and promptly shut it off (the vehicle). Turns out Kia set it up so that when you enter the vehicle with your key (in a remote start condition), it senses it when you shut the door and automatically converts to full run mode. Kind of cool actually.
 
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