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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Afternoon Project | Stealth Storage


I've been spoiled by my previous Suzuki's that had these hidden under floor tool storage areas built in from the factory. But the Seltos' two level flooring makes the perfect opportunity to duplicate. In fact its a big part of why I choose the Kia over some of the other options. I first looked into buying a second deck from my dealerships parts department. They advised $460 Canadian. I wasn't willing to foot that bill, or wait for delivery, without first trying something on my own and it turned out great, potentially better (optional two).

I started the project by swinging by a local lumberyard which I knew would sell half sheets of plywood. Talked to a guy there about options. It doesn't have to be all that rigid cause the spare tire supports any weight that may be on the flooring. There were cheaper options but they lacked rigidity so I paid the extra 7 bucks for 1/4" plywood. I choose 1/4" over a thicker option that would more closely match the factory deck because I wanted as much space as possible beneath the factory deck so I went with as thin as I could while still being rigid, and cost effective.

To save me time I had the lumberyard cut them down for me.
41.5" x 16"
41.5" x 17"

Cost
Half sheet of plywood | $40.00 Cdn
Three cuts | $4.50 Cdn


Placing the sheets on the ground I laid the factory floor on top of it.


Once I lined up the edges, using a marker traced the curved edge of the floor on the 17" thick board.



I jigsawed out the curved shape.


I added a 1 inch hole in the center of the curved edge a few inches back.


The first piece is ready for placement. Dropped it into place in the front of the lower deck, making sure it dropped into the lower indentation. Pulled it snug.

The second piece needs a couple squares cut out of the back corners. I didn't measure mine but they're about the size of a quarter. What you'll do is you'll line the uncut board up against the back and you'll see where you'll need to cut to place it all the way in. Mark the board for cutting. The Yellow Arrow indicates where the board needs to slide a bit further back to match the factory fitment.

NOTE: If you intend to do ‘optional two’ (forthcoming post), you can skip this and just have the board cut to 41.5" x 15". Instead of 16". Should be enough not to need the additional cuts.


Should fit like this after the corners are cut out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Some pics.



Using 1/4" plywood it gives you about 4 1/4" space. Lets say 4" to be safe.


Do you need the rigidity I went with? I don't think so. I think I could have gone with another product that may have been thinner with less rigidity or cheaper. The middle of the floor is fully supported by the spare tire so the stiffness of what you use I don't think is as important unless you plan to put some weight under there. I choose to go with the stiffer 1/4" plywood cause I want it to last the lifetime of the vehicle.


And there we have it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Optional One: Color-matched carpet.

So I've been doing this next thing for 20 years. I've had dogs in the past. And they'd make a mess of the hatches of my prior vehicles. I found that if you bought thin, rubber-backed, non-slip mats you could cut them to size and the rubber backing would hold the carpet fiber together. When I had dogs I'd replace them every so often, I found they protected the factory flooring in the hatch from claws and potential 'accidents'. She was a good dog, and never had an accident, but if she did I would have been glad I had done this. But the process lends well to this application.

Step one. Head out to your local shop that sells mats for doorways. What you're looking for is a mat with a rubber backing. Not all are the same though. If it feels like you could pick it off, keep looking. In my area, I've had good luck with Giant Tiger. Other places I've found in the past, Canadian Tire, Rona.

4'x 3' Mat.
Cost: $16.00 Cdn


Lay it face down on the floor with the rubber side up. Place your newly created floor on top of it with the back edge lined up with the edge of the mat.

NOTE: If you plan to do 'optional two', which I strongly recommend, I'd leave an extra two inches on the back edge, and I wouldn't cut the corners out. See 'optional two' pictures for why.


Trace around your flooring with a sharpie. I recommend a little extra on the front curved edge, this is because there is a lip in the bottom of the trunk, and the little extra is enough to cover it. I found a lego block that was the perfect width. And everyone has a lego block laying around or at least knows how big one is.


Will look like this.


Cut it out. You might need a good stiff pair of scissors. I have some good metal ones, I've been using them for years. They've likely been in the family since before I was born. One of those things they don't make like they used to. I've used kitchen scissors in the past, the ones you use for cutting up meat. You may find some at the local dollar store cheap.


Don't think you need instructions on putting it in the trunk. Here are some pics. The first picture shows why we put the extra inch on the front edge (lego).


 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Optional Two: Rear Backing

So during this process, I came to realize that there really isn't anything substantial keeping stuff from rolling off the bottom deck and falling in underneath the seats. You can kinda see it in the below picture.



From experience with my previous vehicles, I can tell you this can happen so I figured I'd fix it now. I rummaged through my garage and found some 1 x 3 boards I could use. If you were going to duplicate this, I would suspect a 1 x 3, 39" long should work nicely. Didn't measure mine but suspect that would work.

I'll show you what it will look like completed first, then show you the key to why the board isn't affixed at the back of the board but rather forward a bit.





Okay so here's why it isn't screwed to the very back of the board. In the below photo, you'll see a 'circular' cut out in the vehicle’s plastic. This is the trajectory the rear seats take when they are laid down or lifted up. If you screwed the backing directly to the back edge, I'm pretty confident you'd find it hampering the seats when laying them down and lifting them up.



So what you'll do is place the boards in the hatch in their expected position. Then line up the vertical backboard up so that it doesn't interfere with that half circle the seats use. Mark the position so that you can use a few screws to affix the backboard to the rear platform.

NOTE: What would I consider doing differently if I were to do it again? I might make the backboard a full width 41.5" board and simply placed it one inch further in so as to get the full-width back plate.

Here's how mine looks completed.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Finished results.

My little guy thought it would be fun to jump in. Zero flex in the board thanks to the spare tire providing support.


Clean look with a nice dark grey mat hiding the plywood.


Some work stuffs.


Hatch is still fully useable for groceries or hauling something around. Stealth storage.
 
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